Calendar | 16/05/2014

To launch the grant call, we held a seminar, workshop and networking event in Helsinki on 16–17 May 2014. The event was aimed at journalists and researchers.
Add to my calendar 2014-05-16 9:30 2014-05-16 19:00 Europe/Helsinki Is Finland Becoming Polarized? in Helsinki Is Finland Becoming Polarized? in Helsinki Korjaamo Culture Factory, Töölönkatu 51 a-b, Helsinki

2014

16/5

Speakers, performers and organizers

ks_puhujat

Risto Alapuro

Risto Alapuro is professor emeritus in sociology at the University of Helsinki and a long-time member of the Kone Foundation board of trustees. Alapuro’s focus areas have included social movements and networks as well as political conflicts.

Markku Lonkila

Markku Lonkila is Professor of Sociology at the University of Jyväskylä and has researched social networks, civic society, and the connections between social movements, activism and social media. His area of special expertise is Russian society and he has been studying the everyday life, civic society and political culture of Russia from a comparative perspective since the beginning of the 1990s.

Tim Newburn: Reading the Riots

Newburn’s keynote will focus on the Reading the Riots initiative, a collaboration between The Guardian and London School of Economics. He will discuss the unusual nature of the project, will consider the potential for using the Reading the Riots model in other less dramatic instances, as well as reflecting on how the scenery has changed in the period since the London riots of 2011.

Tim Newburn is Professor of Criminology and Social Policy at the London School of Economics (LSE). He is one of Britain’s leading criminologists. He was one of the leading researchers in a joint project by the Guardian and the London School of Economics called Reading the Riots.

Elina Grundström: Who studies, and who interprets?

The digitalisation of the media has changed the forms of journalism and also the relationship between journalists and researchers. Researchers have lost their visibility in the media and journalists have started to encroach on their territory by adopting new forms of investigative journalism and database journalism. Journalists and researchers have recently started to develop new inspiring forms of cooperation. Vast amounts of various forms of data are now available through the media, so interpretation of this data is an essential issue.

Elina Grundström is a Visiting Professor of Journalism at the University of Tampere. She is a freelance journalist and non-fiction writer who studied sociology as her main subject.

Matti Kortteinen: How do you create a big story out of little stories?

Kortteinen talks about conducting and interpreting interviews with individuals. The emphasis is on revealing the main story that describes general social change behind all of the smaller stories told by individuals. In the presentation, the issue is solved using a classic sociological approach. The presentation explains the idea that this approach can easily be broken down and made into a text in a way that has the best journalistic impact.

Matti Kortteinen is a professor of urban sociology who specialises in housing estates, everyday life and issues associated with social exclusion. He has carried out a considerable amount of research on regional and social differentiation in the Helsinki metropolitan area.

Lotta Junnilainen, Eeva Luhtakallio and Maria Mustranta: “There’s no politics here”: Politics at local shopping centres

The status of a poor person in a rich society is to be socially divergent: being poor means more than just material deprivation or low income; it means, above all, social exclusion. In our presentation we describe what it is like to be poor in Finland today, and what are the consequences for participation, political participation and social equality, based on the situation at one shopping centre at a housing estate in Helsinki.

Lotta Junnilainen is compiling an ethnographic study on housing estates built in Helsinki in the 1960s and 1970s for her sociology dissertation at the University of Helsinki .

Eeva Luhtakallio is a researcher and the editor-in-chief of the Sosiologia journal, which specialises in comparative political sociology and participation at the local level.

Maria Mustranta is a freelance journalist who writes about society and the world.

Tuomas Ylä-Anttila and Esa Mäkinen: Will open knowledge save sociology and journalism?  Voting aid applications are used as an example

How should we determine the values of politicians, political parties and voters? How can we use this data to produce scientific research, interesting journalism and applications that are useful for voters? What can researchers and journalists learn from one another? We will provide answers to these questions by using the voting advice application we have developed for Helsingin Sanomat as an example.

Esa Mäkinen is news editor for data & interactives at Helsingin Sanomat.

Tuomas Ylä-Anttila is a political sociology researcher who is interested in social movements, media publicity, politics of global warming, politicians’ values and attitudes, and the use of public data in research.

Veikko Eranti and Antti Järvi: Polarisation of participation: Tales from a Helsinki in which inequality is increasing

Parts of the city are being renewed and changes are being made to the town plan – this is creating heated discussions all over the city. The reactions in some parts of the city are much stronger than in other parts. So what is behind this public participation in the town planning? What does this phenomenon look like to people at the street level, and what about at the city level? The presentation deals with the divisions in participation, and with the combination of micro- and macro-level perspectives.

Veikko Eranti is a researcher of democracy and urban issues, a sociologist, journalist and essayist.

Antti Järvi is a freelance journalist and a member of the Long Play’s editorial staff. Long Play is a digital publisher of slow journalism.

Johanna Vehkoo and Heini Lehtonen: Who does language belong to? “Finnishness” and “foreignness” according to the youth of East Helsinki

The presentation focuses on how the norms of language are established in a linguistically, ethnically and culturally diverse society. Who is regarded as a Finnish speaker? Who does the Finnish language belong to? What kind of stereotypes are associated with “foreigners” and their Finnish?

Johanna Vehkoo is the editor-in-chief of Long Play, a digital publisher of slow journalism. She has written a book about the future of journalism and is a former Fellow of Oxford University’s Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism.

Heini Lehtonen is a sociolinguist, whose doctoral thesis deals with linguistic resources and youth styles in multiethnic Helsinki.

Roi Vaara

Roi Vaara startles audiences with his performances in Finland and abroad. The artist is known for works such as Golden Handshake, White Man and Artist’s Dilemma. Roi Vaara is preparing a work called Eriarvoinen (Unequal) for the event. It is a work of art that is based on time and presence, which is intended to express a complex subject matter using simple methods


Share this : Twitter | Facebook | Email

Programme

Friday 16 May

9:30
Registration and coffee

10:00
Risto Alapuro: Welcome

10:15
Tim Newburn: Reading the Riots (PDF)

11:15
Elina Grundström: Who studies, and who interprets? (PDF) (in Finnish only)

12:15 -13:30
Lunch (at your own cost)

13:30
Matti Kortteinen: How do you create a big story out of little stories? (PDF) (in Finnish only)

14:15
Lotta Junnilainen, Eeva Luhtakallio and Maria Mustranta: “There’s no politics here”: Politics at local shopping centres (PDF) (in Finnish only)

14:45-15:15
Coffee

15:15
Tuomas Ylä-Anttila and Esa Mäkinen: Will open knowledge save sociology and journalism?  Voting aid applications are used as an example (PDF) (in Finnish only)

15:45
Veikko Eranti and Antti Järvi: Polarisation of participation: Tales from a Helsinki in which inequality is increasing (PDF) (in Finnish only)

16:15
Johanna Vehkoo and Heini Lehtonen: Who does language belong to? “Finnishness” and “foreignness” according to the youth of East Helsinki

16:45
Closing of the seminar

17:00-17:45
Wine and snacks

The morning session will be chaired by Risto Alapuro and the afternoon by Markku Lonkila.

Performance artist Roi Vaara will perform during the seminar.

 

Saturday 17 May

9:45
Coffee

10:15
Opening of the day

10:30
World café discussions on the themes of inequality

11:20
Work in theme groups

13:00
Lunch

14:00
Documentary theatre

14:50
Work in theme groups

16:30
Wrapping up: poster session

17:15-19:00
Food, wine and mingling


Share this : Twitter | Facebook | Email

Date and location

Time: Friday 16 May 2014 at 9:30–17:45 and Saturday 17 May at 9:45–19:00
Place: Korjaamo Culture Factory, Töölönkatu 51 a-b, Helsinki


Share this : Twitter | Facebook | Email

Story

When does co-operation work best between researchers and journalists who write about society? Why is poverty especially hereditary these days? Why doesn’t everyone participate in decision-making? How do values turn into political parties? Is an immigrant the same as a foreigner? These questions were addressed by the speakers of the ‘Is Finland Becoming Polarised?’ seminar on Friday. Read Kalle Korhonen’s report on the seminar day.

You can also watch the video from the seminar day on 16 May, 2014.


Share this : Twitter | Facebook | Email

Gallery

Flickr-gallery